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Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day - February 2017

Welcome to Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day for February 2017.

Here in my USDA Hardiness Zone 6a garden in central Indiana the mild winter continues. We speak of it in hushed tones–the warmer temperatures, the lack of snow, the sunshine–as though saying anything about it out loud will cause the snow, ice, and sub freezing temperatures to return abrubtly.

So, let me whisper to you about the blooms in my garden today.

The garden was bathed in full sun when I walked about and took pictures of the blooms. I wore a winter coat but I would have been comfortable in a heavy sweater.

There are crocuses in bloom, of course. I've planted so many over the years. Some disappear, some return.

There are still a few gold crocuses nestled in a bed of sedum under a tree in front.  I generally don't plant gold crocuses in the lawn, lest someone mistake them from afar for dandelions.

Instead, I fill the lawn with white, purple, and lilac colored crocuses.
They are up all over the place. I walk from one group to the next admiring them, remembering them, and marveling at their resilience in the face of winter weather.

The first to come up are those that tend toward the blue side of the purple spectrum, along with the occasional white crocus.

A few days later, these crocuses which tend more toward the pink side of the purple spectrum pop up.

I plan to plant more crocuses, specifically C. tommasinianus, in the lawn  in the fall, to increase the amount in bloom and stay ahead of the squirrels who like to dig them up.

These crocuses are not alone in the garden.

The witchhazel, Hamamelis vernalis, is in full bloom as well.
It has a lovely scent but you have to get right up to the blooms to smell it.

Nearby, the Christmas Rose, Helleborus niger, is also blooming.
It's like a bit of Christmas decoration that I never got around to putting away last month.

What else is blooming?

The snowdrops, of course.
I do like them but they are tiny and I don't have enough of them. They come up in singles and doubles here and there but would be much nicer in drifts, don't you think? I'll add a few dozen to my next bulb order which I'll place as soon as the bulb vendors start taking them.

I may also add another favorite to my order, Iris reticulata.

Yes, the first Iris, Iris reticulata, just opened up in time for me to share it on bloom day.
I'm hoping soon it will be joined by the hundreds of other reticulated irises I've planted over the years, mostly in the front garden.

What's blooming in your garden on this lovely February day? Please join us for Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day and show us.

It is easy to participate and all are welcome. Just post on your blog around the 15th of the month about the blooms in your garden, then leave a link in the Mr. Linky widget below and add a comment to tell us what you've got to show us. As your hostess, I intend to visit each and every one of your gardens, via your blog posts, in the next few days.

And remember always and every year since the first post in February 2007, “We can have flowers nearly every month of the year.” ~ Elizabeth Lawrence



32 comments:

Lee@A Guide to Northeastern Gardening said...

It is wonderful seeing all those blooms coming up in your garden. It has been a relatively uneventful winter here as well, except for an occasional (twice) mention of the word not to be spoken. There are Hellebores blooming here on Long Island with some other subtle hints of spring. It will be a little longer until the crocus start coming, but hopefully soon! Happy Bloom Day Carol!

Jennifer Dennis said...

Hi Carol, Your crocus blooms are very inspiring. I really admire them in lawns. I need to add more in clusters in my garden beds. It's been unseasonably cold here in the PNW..all the plants are behind. I'm looking forward to returning to our normal, mild weather. It's felt like a long winter here.

Sarah Shoesmith said...

Isn't it wonderful to see these little early blooms? I particularly like the Crocus in your lawn. I am a huge fan of Crocus tommasinianus - the bees love it! Iris reticulata are wonderful too. I have them in bowls in my kitchen and out in the borders. Happy GBBD!

VP said...

The crocuses are only just beginning to burst through here Carol, and the snowdrops are coming into peak perfection. I have a new clematis joining them this year :)

Happy Blooms Day everyone!

rusty duck said...

So envious of all your crocuses. The mice eat mine, the little blighters. Loads of snowdrops though. The bulbs are poisonous apparently! Thanks for hosting Carol, Happy Bloom Day :)

Alana said...

Happy Bloom Day, Carol. I love gold crocuses; there don't seem to be a lot of them in upstate New York where I live. So your post was a welcome treat. And now, will you kindly take winter back from us? The people in Maine, especially, would like you to share with them, too.

Lisa Greenbow said...

I just love those little irises. Your crocus planting crusade has paid off with such a delightful display. Happy GBBD.

Helen Malandrakis said...

Crocus in the lawn. Cool!

http://marianstclair.wordpress.com said...

Wow! What a display for February. Happy Bloom Day!

Pauline said...

Love all your crocus in the lawn, must try that here. You have lots of beautiful spring flowers looking very pretty indeed.

Rose said...

Wow, I just can't get over all the blooms you have, Carol! I see the blades of crocuses and daffodils popping up here and there in my garden, but I think any blooms will be awhile in coming. It certainly does feel like spring, though.

outlawgardener said...

Let's hope that your early spring continues as your blooms are looking very happy in the sun. One can never have too many snowdrops! I've never grown iris reticulata but admire their lovely colors at this time of year so may add some to my own bulb order in the fall. Happy GBBD and thanks to you and your garden fairies for continuing to host the party! Is Mister Linky a garden fairy or a blog fairy?

Tina said...

So much beautiful spring color. Couldn't decide which is my favorite--the witch hazel or the various crocuses. Regardless, Happy GBBD and thanks for hosting!

Kris Peterson said...

February in your garden and mine are very different! I do wish I could grow crocus, and witch hazel, and snowdrops...Thank you for hosting, Carol!

danger garden said...

I'm glad to hear winter has treated some gardeners well, because it's been nasty here in Portland, OR.

Jean Campbell said...

February is borrowing from March, else we're having a mild winter. Your bulbs are a great show and I agree with ordering more every year. Thank you for being a great Bloom Day host.

jeansgarden said...

Carol, I'm thrilled by your outdoor blooms in February! Here in Maine, the garden is buried under several feet of snow and we are still a couple of months away from crocuses. -Jean

Kathy Willmering said...

Witch Hazel is on my "someday" list - unusual and interesting! Love the little iris.

Layanee said...

I am looking at a snow covered landscape with not even a fat little bud showing but I know, from looking west, that you will send me that sunshine which will lead to spring blooms. February tests a New England gardener's patience.

Lea said...

Love the Crocus blooms!
I think the Spirea you asked about is 'Ogon' Should be good for your zone. Tiny flowers, but masses of them. Pretty Autumn foliage, too.
Thanks for hosting GBBD!

Kalantikan said...

Oh great, this is the first time i saw that color for Iris reticulata. I wish it reaches this country too! Thanks for hosting the much awaited GBBD.

Andrea said...

Hi Carol, even if this is not in my own garden, it is a tropical plants display, so i joined it in the GBBD today. I hope those in winter climates will enjoy our perennial plants here in the hot tropics. However, this February is the coldest month within the year for us, so giving us lots of bloom.

Shirley/Rock-Oak-Deer said...

Quite a few blooms for so early in your zone. The iris is gorgeous!

Evan Bean said...

It really has been mild in your area. The crocuses aren't blooming in my garden yet, and the Galanthus are just about to open. They do look wonderful in large drifts. I have at least two clumps I need to divide which could be spread out into nice drifts. I hope you get your Galanthus and Iris reticulata drifts!

Anna K said...

Oh, to have a Witchhazel... they are so lovely. Other than that, I can only comment on the obvious - you are further along in Indiana than we are out here in the Pacific NW. Strange times, indeed!

Sofie Vandersmissen said...

Thanks for organizing this wonderful event! You have a lot of beautiful blooms in your garden!

Greetings, Sofie #26
http://sofiecreates.blogspot.be/2017/02/garden-bloggers-bloom-day-february-2017.html

Amy Myers said...

Lovely! You can never have too many snowdrops! And the tiny iris is beautiful...

Kathy said...

We had a mild winter like that last year, and then got sub-zero temps in April. I hope that doesn't happen to you.

ramblinginthegarden said...

Thanks so much for hosting; it's good to have this monthly record

John said...

Hi Carol, we share a lot of flowers though you seem to be ahead of me with the iris. You might want to give Adonis a try. They are wonderful at this time of year.

lula said...

Thanks for hosting, reading all the comments is such an inspiration!

Dee said...

In my garden, those Iris reticulata don't come back for more than a year, and of course, I can't really grow snowdrops. I hear that if you buy them in the green they multiply faster. I may have learned that from Kathy. I do have luck with crocus most years. Much love to you this garden bloggers bloom day. I saw four young dear about 1/2 mile from my house. Dear little deer, not.~~Dee