When a gardener orders pizza

When a gardener orders pizza, she is delighted to find some of her favorite toppings on the menu -- Brassica oleracea, Solanum lycopersicum (which she used to know as Lycopersicum esculentum), and a new one, Cynara cardunculus.

When she orders, the gardener translates these toppings for the waiter as broccoli, tomatoes, and artichokes because she doesn't want to embarrass him if he doesn't know botanical names.

When the waiter delivers the pizza to her table and tells the gardener that it is the most colorful pizza he has served all night, she beams with pride. She has apparently designed a lovely garden pizza.

She takes a picture of it, because she likes pictures of pretty gardens, er... pizzas.

Later, as she eats her garden pizza, the gardener thinks about other plants that make pizzas taste so good including many varieties of Capsicum annuum, Allium cepa, and Agaricus bisporus - peppers, onions, and mushrooms.

She also thinks about herbs that taste good on pizza including Ocimum basilcum and Origanum vulgare, also known as basil and oregano.

She wonders if others think of botanical names when they think of plants and then translate those to common names when they speak of them to others.  She likes to do it just to keep her mind sharp. 

Finally, when a gardener orders pizza, she orders a big enough pizza so she has some left over to take home. The next morning, it is just as colorful, just as tasty, and just as pretty a garden, er.. pizza,  as when it was first served.

Comments

  1. UMMM~No, on the botanical names; but I do think your pizza looks delicious. xogail

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  2. Me either on the botanical names.And how smart to have leftovers so you can garden all Saturday and not have to stop to cook!

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  3. I want one like that.
    So beautiful colors, a garden pizza.....I love it.

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  4. Such a cute post... and your pizza is indeed colorful and "yummy-looking!" As for the botanical names, I try to remember as many as I can of herbaceous perennials, but garden produce - not so much! lol

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  5. If this keeps up I'll have to check and see if Google translates Latin to read your blog. That is one good looking garden pizza!

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  7. Good post Carol. Like myself, though, I would guess you don't like Ananas comosus, another popular choice, on your pizza. Nor Sus domestica, unlike the spammer above.

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  8. No, I don't like pineapple or bacon on my pizza, nor do I like Olea europaea, as a general rule, though I will tolerate it. (oh, and I removed the spammers comment, lest anyone think Becky is a spammer, she is not!)

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  9. I'm feeling the need to be more creative in my pizza ordering....

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  10. So I tried it (since we were heading out for pizza when I was reading this post). The pizza guy's eyes glazed over and he said, "You no speak no Ingleesh?" DH elbowed me and said "Sweet peppers and onions on hers. I'll have artichoke hearts and mushrooms on mine."

    So now they apparently think I don't speak English. They asked DH if I wanted anything to drink and if I wanted extra sauce or extra cheese on my pizza. When we left, I said "Dominus vobiscum". It's the only other Latin I can recall, aside from botanical names LOL.

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  11. At this house it's not pizza with Olea europaea and Allium sativum! Yours looks yummy though! :)

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